Seed list and instructions

Seeds By Mail beta test - Spring 2021

While supplies last. If requested seed is unavailable, a substitution will be sent.

BEANS. 'DRAGON TONGUE WAX'
Pretty wax bean from Holland, with slender 6 - 8” creamy yellow beans marked with delicate purple stripes. Tender snap beans when young, or use for shell beans when the stripes turn red. Ripe dry beans good for soups. Bush bean. After all danger of frost is past, sow in rows 15 - 18" apart, 4 - 6" apart in the row. Seed does not germinate well in cold soil, so it is best to wait for warm weather to plant.

BEANS. 'FAVA SWEET LORANE'
Small-seeded light colored beans bred for low tannin and sweet flavor. Sweet Lorane can be eaten fresh like chickpeas or dried for soup. Very cold hardy and good nitrogen fixer. Organic. Bush bean. After all danger of frost is past, sow in rows 15 - 18" apart, 4 - 6" apart in the row. Seed does not germinate well in cold soil, so it is best to wait for warm weather to plant.

BEANS. 'WHIPPLE'
Family heirloom from the Willamette Valley in Oregon, this is a dry bean for soups and stews. Beans are dark purple-red with white markings, and incredibly flavorful. Bushy plants with an occasional runner. Organically grown. Bush bean. After all danger of frost is past, sow in rows 15 - 18" apart, 4 - 6" apart in the row. Seed does not germinate well in cold soil, so it is best to wait for warm weather to plant.

BEETS. 'GOLDEN DETROIT'
Round orange-gold beets stay sweet even when large. Tender, mild- flavored, and good for pickling. A rich, light sandy loam, kept moist, is best for growing crisp, tender beets. Beets are a good cool weather crop, and can be sown as early as soil can be worked. Sow 1/2" deep in rows 1 foot apart. Thin to 4", using the tender seedlings as early greens. A rich, light sandy loam, kept moist, is best for growing crisp, tender beets.

BROCCOLI. 'CALABRESE'
Introduced to the U.S. by Italian gardeners around the turn of the century, this variety produces 4 - 6" central heads of a deep blue-green color. Once the center head is cut, tender side shoots are produced in abundance for several months. In areas with a cool, mild climate year-round it may become perennial, giving an almost constant crop of sprouts of excellent flavor. Broccoli is a cool weather crop, and seeds may be started early indoors, setting out 2 - 3 weeks before last spring frost. Space 1 1/2 feet apart, in rows 2 feet apart. Likes full sun and a rich, moist well drained soil. Broccoli in the diet helps protect the body from damage due to high doses of X-rays.

BROCCOLI. 'DE CICCIO'
European type from 1890, producing many side shoots over a long season after the large central head is cut. Less uniform and more productive than hybrids, this is great for home gardens. Broccoli is a cool weather crop, and seeds may be started early indoors, setting out 2 - 3 weeks before last spring frost. Space 1 1/2 feet apart, in rows 2 feet apart. Likes full sun and a rich, moist well drained soil. Broccoli in the diet helps protect the body from damage due to high doses of X-rays.

CARROTS. 'SCARLET NANTES'
Long, cylindrical roots to 7", with bright orange color and almost no core. An old favorite for its sweet flavor and fine grained flesh, one of the best for juicing. Colors early for baby carrots. Excellent keeper; can be harvested all winter if left in the ground with a good layer of mulch. For earliest crop, sow as soon as ground can be worked, in rows 1 - 1 1/2 feet apart, thinning to 2 - 4" apart in the row, according to variety. For succession, sow at intervals through mid-summer. A rich, sandy loam is best, but any good, well-cultivated soil will produce satisfactory crops.

CARROTS. 'BLACK SPANISH'
Deep purple skin, pale yellow to white inside, with strong, spicy carrot flavor. Delicious roasted, creamed, or sliced thin for salads. Similar to the black carrots that arrived in Spain from North Africa in the 1300s. Organically grown. For earliest crop, sow as soon as ground can be worked, in rows 1 - 1 1/2 feet apart, thinning to 2 - 4" apart in the row, according to variety. For succession, sow at intervals through mid-summer. A rich, sandy loam is best, but any good, well-cultivated soil will produce satisfactory crops.

CUCUMBER. 'SPACEMASTER'
The perfect cucumber for small areas or containers. Compact plants need 1/3 of the space of other varieties, and adapted to a wide range of conditions. Produces abundant crops of 7 - 8" dark green fruits. Organically-grown. Sow in late spring or early summer in hills 4 feet apart. Plant 8 - 10 seeds per hill. Thin to the 3 or 4 best plants. May be sown early in pots, 4 - 6 weeks before planting out. When transplanting, take care not to disturb the roots. Will produce all abundance of fruit in any good garden soil. Pick cucumbers when dark green, before fully ripened and yellow, or they will die back. Wet soil prevents germination.

CUCUMBER. 'IMPROVED LONG GREEN'
Introduced in 1842, this fine variety has been a favorite in home gardens for over 150 years. Medium-green 10” fruits with few seeds, crisp and flavorful. Dependable and high yielding, good for both pickles and slicing. Sow in late spring or early summer in hills 4 feet apart. Plant 8 - 10 seeds per hill. Thin to the 3 or 4 best plants. May be sown early in pots, 4 - 6 weeks before planting out. When transplanting, take care not to disturb the roots. Will produce all abundance of fruit in any good garden soil. Pick cucumbers when dark green, before fully ripened and yellow, or they will die back. Wet soil prevents germination.

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KALE. 'LACINATO RAINBOW'
Deeply savoyed long narrow leaves overlaid with shades of purple, blue-green, and red. A variety of leaf shapes varying from nearly entire, to very frilly and divided. Very vigorous and cold hardy, perennial in mild climates. Organically grown. In the South, sow in late summer or early fall for winter and spring harvest. In cold climates, sow in late spring for fall harvest. Likes full sun and a rich, well-drained soil. Keep moist. Sow seeds 1/4" deep, thin to 1 1/2 feet apart in rows 1 1/2 - 2 feet apart.

LETTUCE. 'WILD GARDEN MIX'
A diverse lettuce mix. Contains loose leaf, butter, crisp head, romaine—red, purple, green, bronze, speckled—frilly, round, narrow, wide. Amazing diversity for your salads! Organically grown. Sow in rows 1 foot apart as early as the ground can be worked, not covering the seed, as light is needed for germination. Thin to 8" apart as they develop. Or, plant in flats 1 month before planting out. Transplant carefully. Lettuce prefers cool to moderate temperatures, and is best sown in spring or early fall in a light, well-drained soil. Give shade in hot weather. For a continual crop, sow every few weeks, as long as desired.

PEPPER. 'CALIFORNIA WONDER'
Classic big blocky bell peppers, thick and crisp, with mild flavor. Good for stuffing, roasting, grilling, or fresh eating. Deep green to red. Sow seed indoors in early spring, transplant outside about mid May. Space 1 1/2 feet apart in rows 3 feet apart. Many peppers are perennial in mild winter areas.

PEPPER. 'HABANERO CHOCOLATE'
Beautiful deep mahogany-red peppers in the classic Habanero shape and heat. Sow seed indoors in early spring, transplant outside about mid May. Space 1 1/2 feet apart in rows 3 feet apart. Many peppers are perennial in mild winter areas.

RADISH. 'WATERMELON'
Large round white radishes blushed green outside, deep magenta-red inside. Slices look just like slices of a mini-watermelon! Crisp, spicy flavor, best picked at 1 - 2", though they can reach tennis-ball size. A favorite radish. Sow seed as early as ground can be worked in spring, and successively till mid-summer, and again in early fall. Oriental radishes may be sown at any time as they do not have the tendency to become pithy in hot weather like other radishes. Plant 1/2 - 1" deep in any good soil. Space rows 1 foot apart; thin to 2" apart as soon as seedlings appear. Keep soil moist for best results.

SUNFLOWER. 'MAMMOTH GREY STRIPE'
Helianthus Anuus. Heirloom giant sunflower grown since the 1800s. Huge yellow foot-wide flowers on 10 foot tall plants that make a good screen. Fat, grey-striped seeds are abundantly produced, a great food source for wild and domestic animals, birds, and humans. To save seeds, cut mature heads and hang to dry for 3 - 4 weeks. Easily grown in most soils. Plant outside as early as possible to miss heavy frosts, to germinate in about 1 - 3 weeks. For early flowers, start indoors as early as February or March, to germinate in about 10 days at 60 - 65°F. Plant out in April or May.

TOMATO. 'BLACK FROM TULA'
Russian heirloom with rosy-purple irregularly-shaped fruits, said by some to be the "ugliest and most delicious" tomato ever grown (vying with the Purple Calabash for this). Rich flavor, sweet and tart. Small plants produce large tomatoes. Brought into circulation by the Seed Saver's Exchange. Seed is best started early indoors, about 6 weeks before the last frost. Sow in a rich, light soil, and transplant to another flat when 3" tall, spacing 4" apart. When all danger of frost has passed and ground has warmed, set plants out into a well-manured, deeply dug soil, spacing 3 - 5 feet apart.

TOMATO. 'BRANDYWINE'
This is the original variety with large pink beefsteak tomatoes, famous for its rich, intense, full-bodied flavor. Amish heirloom from 1885, later obtained and maintained by Ben Quisenberry and the Seed Saver's Exchange. Potato-leaf type, indeterminate. Seed is best started early indoors, about 6 weeks before the last frost. Sow in a rich, light soil, and transplant to another flat when 3" tall, spacing 4" apart. When all danger of frost has passed and ground has warmed, set plants out into a well-manured, deeply dug soil, spacing 3 - 5 feet apart.

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Source: jlhudsonseeds.net

Seeds By Mail is a beta test for sending seeds to Menlo Park residents in a way that is safe, equitable, and accessible. This beta test is offered to Menlo Park residents who have expressed interest in the Menlo Park Seed Library.

 

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